Friday, May 24, 2013

Illustration Friday: Tension

Illustration Friday: Every Friday a word is given on the website, IllustrationFriday.com. Artists and illustrators then submit an image that represents that word all during the week.

This week's word: TENSION


THOUGHT PROCESS:
First thing I thought of were my dogs. Every moment seems to be a highly intense for the little one who is an Australian Cattle Dog, (which are lovable but highly energetic dogs.) Between the two, there is a constant competition for attention.

But when a treat or food is involved . . . that's when we get a lot of tension. There tends to be a very short staring contest and usually the little one will snap at the bigger to win the "prize."



FOCUS: 
I wanted to create that intensity of the staring contest.  Having them butt heads and have their eyes practically touching each other seemed to work. Adding the star-burst and motion lines helps increase the level of tension.

I wanted to do this week's image very quickly, simple and under 30 minutes. It took about 24 minutes to create. A video of creating this image will be posted on YouTube.

RE: Illustration Friday

If you would like to join in on the fun, head over to Illustration Friday. It's totally free, no need to login or sign up for anything. You can view all the submissions from this week (and past archives of previous words.) Have a sketch to show? Send your own artwork up for others to see.

Friday, May 10, 2013

Illustration Friday: Future

It's Illustration Friday -- which means it's time to play creative word association! Each week a word is given on the website, IllustrationFriday.com. Artists and illustrators then submit an image that represents that word. My added challenge is to try to do something humorous. I find this is not only fun - but just a great exercise for creating and experimenting with painting programs.

This week's word: FUTURE

I didn't have much time this week since my workload is very heavy making pet clothing designs/sayings/patterns for PetSmart -- but I still wanted to submit an image for the site. So I did a digital sketch in pencil. No coloring, inking, etc.
Cartoon pencil sketch based on Rodin's The Thinker

THOUGHT PROCESS:
For me, the first thing that comes to mind about the future is a robot. When I think of robots, I often wonder if I'll see the day a robot or computer will have it's own thoughts (or develop an original thought/concept based on existing patterns of design.) We are getting closer and closer to actual artificial intelligence, and while the true concept of that may never be achieved, we know we already use A.I.-like programming to solve and explore possibilities never previously thought of before. 

So a robot thinking made me think of Rodin's timeless classic statue, The Thinker. I found a reference image and began drawing a robot sitting is that familiar pose.

Image of Rodin's Thinker used for reference
FOCUS & TWIST:
So what would a robot be thinking of? I tried to convey that the computer the robot was sitting on wasn't working and the robot was trying to figure out "why?" By making his eyes look down and away from the computer's plug, we get the sense he may never come up with a solution -- that the solution is so apparently close.

The typed message is a spin on the old catch phrase, but I thought it'd be fun to change the phrase "under our noses" to "under our olfactory sensory nodules."


Illustration Friday

If you would like to join in on the fun, head over to Illustration Friday. It's totally free, no need to login or sign up for anything. You can view all the submissions from this week (and past archives of previous words.) Have a sketch to show? Send your own artwork up for others to see.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Illustration Friday (on Wednesday): Farewell

You may notice it's not Friday. 
This past Illustration Friday I was too busy getting ready being the Best Man for my brother's wedding. (And yes, it was a wonderful weekend at the Physick House in Philadelphia.)

The word for this week is: FAREWELL. This word was a big challenge, especially since I want to do only humorous/fun images -- and this word was directly associated with sadness.


Illustration Friday's submission for the word FAREWELL done in digital color pencil
THOUGHT PROCESS: My first thought was to create an image of a small character waving goodbye to a large character walking away. The farewell ending music from my childhood TV show "The Incredible Hulk" started to come to mind. That classic image of Bruce ("David") Banner walking away from yet another location. But doing an image of Hulk sulking away didn't seem funny -- and I couldn't think of an appropriate small character to be waving goodbye. 

Quick pen doodle of my "mental" concept for FAREWELL
So I thought what type of goodbye would seem funny?
A goodbye that was sarcastic.


That's when I thought of a parent saying goodbye to their child leaving home, (but deep down the parent is extremely happy to see the child go) -- aka leaving the nest.

That's when I first envisioned the image of a Momma bird "encouraging" her young to leave the nest. Originally, I did a quick sketch with two chicks being booted, but somehow the idea of several being "kicked" at once seemed more cruel then just the one.

FOCUS: I also thought the idea of giving zombie-like, dead pan eyes would make the bird characters funnier. The eyes make it seem like the Momma bird is just going through the motions - staring at you, the viewer, as if to say "I'm doing this because this is what nature intended me to do." There is also a humorous disconnect of the Momma not looking at the chick as it plummets. (But don't worry, the chick flies away safely . . . honest!)

DRAWING PROCESS: For this image - I used digital color pencils on very rough textured papered surface. When finishing, I used a very thin eraser across the image's outlines to make them break up and seem more scratchy.

(UPDATE)
I had played around with this style of the image, with more solid ink lines and a moss paint brush canopy of "leaves" on top of the image. I didn't care for the solid lines for this image - and the 3D Moss brush clashes with the 2D line work. The "leaves" are also too strong and take away from the focus of the image.
I thought I'd post it here just to show the difference.



Earlier pen ink style lines with 3D moss brush for leaves